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Increasing Motivation

Methods for increasing self-determination and self-efficacy include modifying the social context, increasing the motivational climate, and promoting autonomy-supported behaviors.



Methods for increasing self-determination and self-efficacy include modifying the social context, increasing the motivational climate, and promoting autonomy-supported behaviors. Which of these intervention approaches is subsequently most effective in increasing motivation? Why?


When it comes to increasing self-determination and self-efficacy, there are several means to an end that can be accomplished, however they largely fall within the vein of a few general categories. When looking at modifying the social context, increasing the motivational climates, and promoting autonomy supportive behaviors, they each offer varying strengths and intelligible nuggets for conversation. Perhaps one of the most widely studied, documented, and largely accepted bodies of work in this area is Self-Determination Theory (SDT). Autonomy is one of the central themes within SDT. It refers to an individual's self-organization and self-regulation. Furthermore, when an individual maintains autonomy his or her respective behaviors are self-regulated dependent on not only intrinsic, but extrinsic factors, as opposed to just being conjured up by external pressures (Deci & Ryan, 2000).


“When looking at modifying the social context, increasing the motivational climates, and promoting autonomy supportive behaviors, they each offer varying strengths and intelligible nuggets for conversation.”

Any coach, leader, or manager can modify the motivational climate and social context, but according to Ryan and collegues (2011), individuals need to be actively engaged and have an above average willingness to act, inevitably leading towards the propensity to learn and apply any new inheritable attributes from their environment and or instructors. With that said, the environment may change, but the internal ambience within each respective individual may stay concrete, making it harder to increase self-determination and self-efficacy. According to the research, when there are external rewards given to individuals for doing things that they are naturally interested in doing, one tends to feel controlled by such rewards ultimately leading to less intrinsic motivation (Deci & Ryan, 2000). Ultimately, promoting autonomy-supported behaviors proves to be the superior choice in increasing self-determination and self-efficacy.


References:

Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (2000). The 'What' and 'Why' of Goal Pursuits: Human Needs and the Self-Determination of Behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11(4), 227.


Ryan, R. M., Lynch, M. F., Vansteenkiste, M., & Deci, E. L. (2011). Motivation and

autonomy in counseling. psychotherapy, and behavior change: A look at theory and

practice. The Counseling Psychologist, 39(2), 193-260.



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