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Training Adaptations

Updated: Oct 8, 2022

Do practice-related effects differ from training-related effects?

There are significant anatomical and morphological changes that occur within the central nervous system as a result of practice and training. Do practice-related effects differ from training-related effects? Why or why not?


Any type of training will yield some type of effect, whether quantitatively or In terms of efficiency. From a purely physical and exercise science point of view, physical training yields a morphological effect on skeletal, and muscular structures. Constructs such as the GAS syndrome or General Adaptation Syndrome tells us that the energy systems in our body such as the muscular, oxidative, and cardiovascular systems will adapt to the means in which an individual is training (Radel et al, 2011). Often times, these results text from training are measurable and can be periodized over a certain period of weeks, months, and even years. I see this in effect on a daily basis as I am responsible for giving athletes various training loads that will assist in strength, preventative, and rehabilitative needs.


"Constructs such as the GAS syndrome or General Adaptation Syndrome tells us that the energy systems in our body such as the muscular, oxidative, and cardiovascular systems will adapt to the means in which an individual is training.

When it comes to practice on the other hand, the measurables become a bit more subjective. Practice, undoubtedly overtime, will yield results. The neuromuscular pathways which are fortified through hours of practice, watching film, and even meditating have been shown to have a positive effect on performance gains. Zinke et al (2014) show that working memory (WM) can actually be improved and possibly have a positive correlation to performance through adaptive and extended training. In summation, both training effects and practice effects will yield differences. The notable physical differences tend to be manifested in physical attributes such as size, speed, and power. Whereas the practice-related effects will lean towards neuromuscular attributes such as sharp memory, efficiency, spatial awareness, and other like constructs.


References:

Radel, R., Pelletier, L. G., Sarrazin, P., & Milyavskaya, M. (2011). Restoration process of the need for autonomy: The early alarm stage. Journal Of Personality And Social Psychology, 101(5), 919-934. doi:10.1037/a0025196


Zinke, K., Zeintl, M., Rose, N. S., Putzmann, J., Pydde, A., & Kliegel, M. (2014). Working memory training and transfer in older adults: Effects of age, baseline performance, and training gains. Developmental Psychology, 50(1), 304-315. doi:10.1037/a0032982






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